Friday, July 10, 2009

Losing to Win

Circumstances do arise in life when sacrifices are essential, short term has to be compromised for the long term, or in relationships for the very basis of its sustenance, one will have to willingly give in. To me that’s victory of my humility over my ego. If this is achieved, I consider I have evolved and grown as a person.

How did I choose to write on this? I remembered the story ‘Babus of Nayanjore’ written by Guruji Rabindranath Tagore, and the lesson learnt after reading this beautiful piece. Succintly put, this is the story of a rich old man who lost all his wealth but still lived his life narrating the happenings of the glorious days. Not a penny in his pocket but made it appear to people that he was still affluent. Allowing the old man the space to live his life the same way till his heavenly calling came one day is what has been narrated by Guruji Tagore. A must read for one and all, and available if you google.

This story provided me the insight as to how one can respect the other’s self worth and identity without calling the bluff. The easiest thing would be to expose the individual and demean him. That would be the common way of leading life. But it requires a very different mindset to be otherwise and uphold the other individual’s respect and dignity. To my grey matter, this truly is human growth.

12 comments:

DebraLSchubert said...

Your posts are so inspirational! I do wonder, though, where the line is between allowing someone their dignity and gently pulling them back into "reality." (Whatever THAT is!!!!)

Sylvia K said...

I, too, always learn something inspiring from your posts and today was no exception. As you probably know by now, I am a great admirer of Tagore, but I haven't read this. So, that will be goal for the weekend!

And may your weekend be lovely!

Hopeless Romantic said...

i haven't read much of tagore, but it does seem very influential from the people i have interacted with, surely would like to lay my hands one day on it.

Thanks for sharing it!

Cheers!

Kavi said...

The likes of the Babu of Nayanjore have for long existed in the real world !

Sometimes living in the past, is a way of getting by with the present. But then, it pretty much blanks out the future.

But then, again, what the future is and needs to be, is decided by the Babus of Nayanjore themselves. Life is a result of the choices that we make !

Thank you for sharing sir !

Ugich Konitari said...

I am so grateful you posted this. I didn't know about the story, and will certainly read it.

This is just an observation , after having very closely interacted in the recent past with very aged terminally sick, and very young learning disabled folks.

Its all about respecting and ensuring that the other person's self esteem is intact and increasing. I have seen it do wonders.

Learning to see things through the other person's eyes , is a start....

A wonderful post...

nsiyer said...

thanks Debrah. My answer is wherver and whenever it affects hiuman dignity.

Iam inspired Sylvia and I am happy my writings make some impact somewhere.

nsiyer said...

thanks Amit. I will suggest you read 'HOme Coming' and' kabuliwallah'. Both of them are a treat.

Hi Kavi. Its more written from the point of view of how we treat 'winners turned losers'. I do appreciate your point of view.

sujata said...

Its a beautiful story on many levels. It talks about false images, holding on to the past and it also talks about the wisdom to know all this and yet let someone save their face, as probably thats the only thing they have at the moment. Why call it off!

nsiyer said...

thanks Ugich Konitari. Its all about self esteem and allowing the other person to save his face.

Very well said Sujata. I just would like to add ' anyway who gives us the right to call it off - acquired arrogance' and one does it merrily without a thought in the world for the other person

Aparna said...

My daughter had to read Babus of Nayanjore for her course last year and that is when I read it.
The story of how a young man, despite his initial scorn understood that pride was the only thing the old man had to cling to, moved me beyond words.
It is amazing how, without sounding preachy, Tagore made us aware of our need to be sympathetic to human failings.
I am so happy you wrote this post.

Sucharita Sarkar said...

Rabindranath Tagore had the ability to see right into the heart of human nature and your post illustrates that point so well.

Eskimo Bob said...

I'll have to find this book - sounds good.